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Accounting for Value Accounting for Value

by Stephen Penman

Book Reviews

"Accounting for Value is a thoughtful yet widely accessible discourse on how accounting facilitates valuation. It is a gold mine of ideas for investors, academics, and market regulators and establishes Stephen Penman as the modern day standard bearer of the Graham School of Fundamental Investing. Anyone who cares about the role of accounting in this increasingly complex world should read this book."
-- Charles M. C. Lee, Joseph McDonald Professor of Accounting, Stanford University

"In his latest book, Stephen Penman displays his mastery of the language of accounting through an integrated view of the interactions of company balance sheets and income statements. This approach allows an investor to more effectively 'account for value' and identify opportunities in the capital markets."
-- Mitchell R. Julis, cochairman and co-CEO, Canyon Partners, LLC

"This book cleverly weaves together important but otherwise unreconciled themes, enhancing our conceptual understanding of the nature and usefulness of accounting in valuation. Stephen Penman also updates the Benjamin Graham school of investment thought by incorporating changes in the economy, accounting, and financial modeling."
-- Stephen Ryan, New York University, Stern School of Business