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A Small Indiscretion: A Novel A Small Indiscretion: A Novel

by Jan Ellison

Book Reviews

"Ellison is a tantalizing storyteller, dropping delicious hints of foreshadowing and shifting back and forth in time, leaving the reader off-kilter at times but moving her story forward with cinematic verve."
-- USA Today

"An engrossing, believable, gracefully written family drama that reveals our past's bare-knuckle grip on our present."
-- Emma Donoghue, New York Times bestselling author of Room

"The literary equivalent of a day spa: sink in, tune out, turn page, turn page, turn page. Delicious, lazy-day reading . . . just don't underestimate the writing."
-- O: The Oprah Magazine (Editor's Pick)

"This voice is alive. It knows something. It will take us somewhere. The magic is accomplished so fast, so subtly, that most readers hardly notice . . . A Small Indiscretion is rich with suspense . . . astonishing . . . Delectable elements of this terrific first novel abound: Its characters are round and real . . . Ellison gives us an achingly physical sense of family life . . . Lovely writing guides us through, driven by a quiet generosity . . . This voice knows something, and by the end of the novel, so do we."
-- San Francisco Chronicle (Book Club Pick)

"Part psychological thriller, part character study, I peeled back the pages on this book as fast as I could."
-- The Huffington Post

"A stunning debut by Jan Ellison . . . Like the photograph that arrives in the mail and sets in motion the plot of this gorgeous novel, A Small Indiscretion reminds us of the intensity of youthful desire and of the fragile nature of a marriage built on secrecy."
-- Ann Packer, New York Times bestselling author of The Dive from Clausen's Pier

"Rich and detailed . . . The plot explodes delightfully, with suspense and a few twists. Using second-person narration and hypnotic prose, Ellison's debut novel is both juicy and beautifully written. How do I know it's juicy? A stranger started reading it over my shoulder on the New York City subway, and told me he was sorry that I was turning the pages too quickly."
-- Flavorwire

"Are those wild college days ever really behind you? Happily married Annie finds out."
-- Cosmopolitan

"An impressive fiction debut . . . both a psychological mystery and a study of the divide between desire and duty."
-- San Jose Mercury News

"A novel to tear through on a plane ride or on the beach . . . I was drawn into a web of secrets, a world of unrequited love and youthful mistakes that feel heightened and more romantic on the cold winter streets of London, Paris, and Ireland."
-- Bustle

"Ellison renders the California landscape with stunning clarity . . . She writes gracefully, with moments of startling insight . . . Her first novel is an emotional thriller, skillfully plotted in taut, visual scenes."
-- The Rumpus

"To read A Small Indiscretion is to eat fudge before dinner: slightly decadent behavior, highly caloric, and extremely satisfying. . . . An emotional detective story that . . . mirrors real life in ways that surprise and inspire."
-- New York Journal of Books

"If you liked Gone Girl for its suspenseful look inside the psychology of a bad marriage, try A Small Indiscretion. . . . It touches many of the same nerves."
-- StyleCaster