Search Books:

Join our mailing list:

Bookmark and Share

New Articles

The Mystery Murder Case of the Century
by Robert Tanenbaum


Which Brass Ring for You: Popularity or Success?
by JV Venable


Autistic Students: Are We Asking Them to Do Their Best While They Feel Their Worst?
by Janet Lintala


The Enemy Within
by Jason Riley


Prologue
by Anna Godbersen


view more>>


Recent Placements


Ross W. Greene
Boston Globe
How to raise human beings who are ready for the real world

Paul Smith
Leadership-Tools.com
Sell With A Story review

Paul Smith
Read to Lead
How to Capture Attention, Build Trust & Close the Sale

Ross W. Greene
Washington Post
Child psychologist: This is how to raise human beings who are ready for the real world

Leland Faust
ValueWalk
A Capitalist's Lament: How Wall Street Is Fleecing You and Ruining America


view more>>


The Dieter's Paradox: Why Dieting Makes Us Fat Excerpt from The Dieter's Paradox: Why Dieting Makes Us Fat

by Alexander Chernev

Bookmark and Share


Stay the Course

Our weight-loss efforts are often derailed by our focus on short-term results and lack of commitment to a particular course of action. Even when we are devoted to the idea of dieting, we seem to have trouble staying loyal to the chosen dieting plan. The following strategies can help curb this consistency bias:

Control mindless habits. Mindless eating has become ingrained in our lifestyle. Too often we eat out of habit, grabbing things just because they're out there in plain sight, waiting to be eaten. To get a grip on these subconscious impulses, make indulgences less frequent, less prominent, and less convenient. Avoid temptations by banishing them from your daily routine.

Think long term. Our myopic focus on immediate results makes us seek drastic solutions, downplaying the effect of incremental changes. We fail to visualize the long-term impact of our short-term actions and refuse to believe that skipping a 400- calorie muffin every morning could reduce our annual calorie intake by as much as 150,000 calories (equal to the recommended calorie intake for 60 full days). Over the long run, small changes produce big results.

Set actionable goals. Having the vague goal of "dieting" without a defined action plan can hardly help one lose weight. To be actionable, goals need be specific: they must pinpoint the desired outcomes and set a time frame for achieving these outcomes. Writing down goals makes them easier to share, which further strengthens our commitment and makes us more accountable for reaching them. Set actionable goals and fortify your commitment by writing down and sharing these goals.

Manage variety. Variety can both facilitate and hamper weight-management efforts. Abundant variety makes us eager to try all the different options available and in many cases leads to overconsumption. Not enough variety can lead to boredom and increased consumption because lack of novelty blunts satisfaction and delays satiation. Introduce variety into your menu while controlling total consumption.

Think carrots, not sticks. Diets based only on inhibition are short-lived: they produce short-term results and are often followed by a rebound. (This is why many crash diets create repeat customers!) The goal is not to conquer the indulgent urges but to pacify them with sensible rewards. Focus on what to achieve, not just what to avoid.

Think beyond consumption episodes. Thinking about food in terms of consumption episodes makes us vulnerable to the "what-the-hell" effect. Once we break our diet, we consider the entire meal or event "spoiled" and consequently overindulge in the very behavior we've been trying to avoid. Break away from the "what-the-hell" mentality.

The above is an excerpt from the book The Dieter's Paradox: Why Dieting Makes Us Fat by Alexander Chernev. The above excerpt is a digitally scanned reproduction of text from print. Although this excerpt has been proofread, occasional errors may appear due to the scanning process. Please refer to the finished book for accuracy.

Copyright © 2011 Alexander Chernev, author of The Dieter's Paradox: Why Dieting Makes Us Fat

Author Bio
Alexander Chernev,
author of The Dieter's Paradox: Why Dieting Makes Us Fat, is a psychologist who is studying how people make choices. He holds two doctoral degrees: a Ph.D. in Psychology from Sofia University and a second Ph.D. in Business Administration from Duke University. He is a marketing professor at Northwestern University, where he teaches behavioral decision theory, marketing management and strategy, and consumer research.

Dr. Chernev has won numerous awards for his teaching and research, including the Early Career Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association for his contribution to consumer psychology. His research has been published in leading psychology journals, and a recent survey ranked him as the most prolific scholar in the top marketing journals in the past 20 years. He has been widely quoted in the business and popular press, including Scientific American, Business Week, Forbes, Newsweek, U.S. News & World Report, Time Magazine, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, and Harper's Magazine.

He is not on a diet but often adds a healthy option to his meals.

For more information please visit http://www.dietersparadox.com/, and follow the author on Facebook and Twitter